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Report Title: Working Safely in Laboratories: Basic Principles and Guidelines
Report ID: 576
Date: 12/1/2008
Author: BG Chemie
Report Type: Guidance Document
URL: [index.jsp]
Country: Germany
Organization: BG Chemie
Summary: This document (BGI/GUV-1) gives safety recommendations for handling hazardous materials and substances in laboratories. Nanomaterials are covered under these safety precautions as hazardous materials. Only the measures required to control or eliminate the hazards identified based upon assessments need to be taken, and of these, technical measures take the highest priority. Though organizational and personal measures, such as safety glasses, are of second priority, they are essential in laboratories due to the high level of manual work. Typical hazards in laboratories include fire and explosion hazards, risk of materials causing damage to health, risk of unknown or out of control reactions, and skin/eye hazards from irritant substances. This document presents the technical, organizational, and personal measures required to safely work with such hazardous substances.



Report Title: Responsible Production and Use of Nanomaterials
Report ID: 575
Date: 3/11/2008
Author: German Chemical Industry Association (VCI)
Report Type: Guidance Document
URL: [Default2~cmd~get_dwnld~docnr~122306~file~Nano.....]
Country: Germany
Organization: German Chemical Industry Association (VCI)
Summary: The German chemical industry has core principles and commitments under the Responsible Care Global Charter of the International Council of Chemical Associations (ICCA). This document contains guidance documents and recommendation papers for the safe handling of nanomaterials in accordance with these principles. In the area of product safety and regulatory compliance, the VCI has issued documents regarding REACH and guidance for a tiered assessment of gathering hazard information regarding nanomaterials. In conjunction with BAuA (the German Federal Institute for Occupational Safety and Health), the VCI has issued guidance for handling and use of nanomaterials in the workplace. Regarding best practices for sharing information regarding nanomaterials in the supply chain, VCI has issued guidance on nanomaterial safety data sheets. To close knowledge gaps in hazardous effects of nanomaterials, a number of joint safety research studies are ongoing, some of which are described in the included roadmap.
Archived Copy: vci_nanomaterial_papers_575_4254.pdf



Report Title: Ultrafine Aerosols and Nanoparticles at the Workplace
Report ID: 573
Date: 6/1/2011
Report Type: Webpage
URL: [index.jsp]
Country: Germany
Organization: Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (IFA) of the German Social Accident Insurance
Summary: The German Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (IFA) created this website to explain and give guidance on the usage of nanomaterials in the workplace. It explains the definition of nanomaterials, and contains links to the current state of the art in toxicology studies, measurement, protective recommendations, and more. The German Federal Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (BAuA) has conducted a risk assessment on toner particle emissions from photocopiers and but general risks are still uncertain.



Report Title: Innovation Promoting Good Practice Approaches Toward the Responsible Handling of Nanomaterials
Report ID: 571
Date: 5/1/2008
Author: Hessian Ministry of Economy, Transport and Regional Development
Report Type: Guidance Document
URL: [Suppl-NanoKomm_final_Web.pdf]
Country: Germany
Organization: Hessian Ministry of Economy, Transport and Regional Development (Germany)
Summary: This German-language document is an overview of recommendations for small and medium sized businesses in the German state of Hessen. It discusses what nanomaterials are, the current risk assessment, nanomaterial measurements, workplace protection measures, and risk perception and communication. REACH requires that the properties of nanomaterials be characterized, and there are EC Directives which regulate classification, labeling, and packaging. The TSCA (Toxic Substances Control Act) also applies, and local German regulations (such as guidelines from BAuA) also impact small and medium sized businesses.
Archived Copy: Suppl-NanoKomm_final_Web_571_6732.pdf



Report Title: Information platform Nano-Sicherheit.de
Report ID: 564
Date: 1/1/2009
Author: Hessen-Nanotech
Report Type: Webpage
URL: [Default.htm]
Country: Germany
Organization: Hessen-Nanotech (Germany)
Summary: This German-language website, a product of the Hessian Ministry of Economy, Transport and Regional Development (a sub-division of the German government), is a service to companies operating in Hessen who wish to use nanomaterials. It contains a variety of nanotech information, such as definitions, basics of risk assessment, risk management, information on the legal framework, communications, and public perception.



Report Title: Nanomaterials: Safety Aspects
Report ID: 558
Date: 10/1/2009
Author: State Research Centre for Environment, Measurements, and Nature Conservation, Baden-Württemberg
Report Type: Government Report
URL: [nanomaterialien_arbeitsschutzaspekte.pdf]
Country: Germany
Organization: State Research Centre for Environment, Measurements, and Nature Conservation, Baden-Württemberg
Summary: This German-language report from the German state of Baden-Württemberg describes safety aspects of nanomaterials. Knowledge gaps in safety data make it difficult to ascertain the appropriate regulatory level, and there are no specific occupational exposure limits for nanomaterials currently set. Established and proven protective measures should be undertaken, such as replacement of problematic materials (substitution), technological protective measures, organizational protective measures, and personal protection. Reliable long-term employment exposure limits need to be established as well as exposure scenarios under REACH, but until sufficient safety data is collected, this remains a distant goal. The lack of a reporting requirement for manufacturers and users of nanomaterials also creates an unclear picture of the exposure situation.
Archived Copy: nanomaterialien_arbeitsschutzaspekte_558_6136.pdf



Report Title: Report and Recommendations of the NanoKommission of the German Federal Government
Report ID: 557
Date: 11/1/2008
Author: NanoKommission
Report Type: Government Report
URL: [nanokomm_abschlussbericht_2008.pdf]
Country: Germany
Organization: NanoKommission (Germany)
Summary: This German-language report of the NanoKommission investigates the benefits and risks of nanotechnologies. The NanoKommission was created by Germany’s federal government in 2006 to work with stakeholders in establishing a dialogue regarding nanotech and to determine what focus areas require attention. The NanoKommission has three working groups: Opportunities for Environment and Health, Risks and safety research, and Principles for the responsible use with nanomaterials. Among its recommendations are a provisional classification of nanomaterials among different groups (likely hazard, possible risk, and risk unlikely) while further risk assessment is completed.
Archived Copy: nanokomm_abschlussbericht_2008_557_6112.pdf



Report Title: Nanomaterials in the Laboratory
Report ID: 556
Date: 9/13/2010
Author: BG Chemie
Report Type: General Report
URL: [Nano-im-Labor20100913.pdf]
Country: Germany
Organization: BG Chemie
Summary: This German language document, produced by BG Chemie, the German chemical industry’s employer liability insurance association, briefly describes what nanomaterials are, their risks in the workplace, protective measures, and routes of exposure. It remarks that additional risk assessment is needed.
Archived Copy: Nano-im-Labor20100913_556_1031.pdf



Report Title: Responsible Handling of Nanotechnology at Evonik
Report ID: 552
Date: 2/1/2010
Author: Evonik Industries
Report Type: Briefing Sheet
URL: [Nano%20Guideline_e.pdf]
Country: Germany
Organization: Evonik Industries
Summary: Evonik Industries, a German chemicals corporation, published this brief document describing its nanotechnology usage. Evonik provides the “maximum possible protection” for workers and the environment through usage of closed-plant production, filters, extraction systems, and personal protective equipment. Nanoparticle levels are measured and workers have routine medical check-ups. The company supports further research on the safety of nanomaterials, and bases its protective measures upon scientific investigations of risk assessment. The Chemicals Management System is used for risk assessment of Evonik’s products as is required by REACH regulations. Evonik also freely shares data on its nanomaterials under REACH requirements and those of the International Council of Chemical Associations (ICCA).
Archived Copy: Nano Guideline_e_552_9070.pdf



Report Title: Nanomaterials in the Workplace
Report ID: 547
Date: 5/1/2010
Author: DGUV (German Social Accident Insurance)
Report Type: Guidance Document
URL: [I_5149.pdf]
Country: Germany
Organization: DGUV (German Social Accident Insurance)
Summary: This German-language publication from the DGUV describes the risks posed by nanomaterials in the workplace and how those risks can be mitigated through preventative measures. While there is yet scientific evidence that particular diseases are caused by nanomaterial exposure, animal experiments have shown inflammation of the respiratory tract and the similarity of some nanomaterials to asbestos creates concern. The three routes of nanoparticle exposure to the human body are airway, ingestion, and through the skin. Translocation, or the ability for nanoparticles to penetrate tissue and move through the body, has been demonstrated with inhaled nanoparticles, but not dermal exposure. In terms of legislation, there is a potential need for the EU’s REACH to address nano-specific ricks. The German Ordinance on Industrial Safety and Hazardous Substances requires that employers perform risk assessments and identify protective measures first before an employee is permitted to engage in work with hazardous substances. The Precautionary Principle must also be followed.
Archived Copy: I_5149_547_2959.pdf



Report Title: FAQs to Work with Nanomaterials
Report ID: 546
Date: 9/1/2010
Author: DGUV (German Social Accident Insurance)
Report Type: FAQ
URL: [FAQs_Nano_021110.pdf]
Country: Germany
Organization: DGUV (German Social Accident Insurance)
Summary: This German-language FAQ answers common questions regarding working with nanomaterials, with a focus on health concerns for exposed workers. It explains what nanoparticle dust is, levels of exposure in the workplace (welding is especially high), how nanoparticles are taken into the body, epidemiological evidence of health effects, etc. The FAQ anticipates questions from a worker’s perspective, such as whether all nanomaterials are equally dangerous (no), whether nanotubes can cause cancer (studies are lacking but since some are similar to asbestos, there should be concern), if specific medical tests can currently identify nano-related diseases (no), and what can the company doctor do (evaluate material safety data sheets and attempt to minimize exposure).
Archived Copy: FAQs_Nano_021110_546_2720.pdf



Report Title: Safe Use of Nanomaterials in the Paint and Coatings Industry
Report ID: 542
Date: 9/1/2009
Author: Hessian Ministry of Economy, Transport and Regional Development
Report Type: Operation Guide
URL: [Betriebsleitfaden_NanoFarbeLacke_Vorab.pdf]
Country: Germany
Organization: Hessian Ministry of Economy, Transport and Regional Development (Germany)
Summary: This German-language publication is targeted toward the paint industry, which has begun to use nano-coatings in products for increased performance. It contains practical recommendations for the safe use of nanomaterials in the paint and coatings industry. Key recommendations are that nanomaterials should be broadly defined, significant knowledge gaps exist and so usage of nanomaterials should be on the Precautionary Principle, the primary objective must be to avoid inhalation, if inhalation cannot be avoided then measures such as personal protection devices should be used to reduce exposure, entry of nanomaterials into the environment should be kept as low as possible, and transparency of information should be improved.
Archived Copy: Betriebsleitfaden_NanoFarbeLacke_Vorab_542_1119.pdf



Report Title: Bayer Code of Good Practice for Production and On-Site Use of Nanomaterials
Report ID: 540
Date: 8/4/2007
Author: Bayer AG
Report Type: Guidance Document
URL: [Bayer-Code-of-Good-Practice-zum-Umgang-bei-He.....]
Country: Germany
Organization: Bayer AG
Summary: Bayer AG, a German chemical and pharmaceutical company, published this German-language Code of Good Practice to describe how the company deals with nanomaterials. It describes generally how research is ongoing to ascertain the hazardous properties of nanomaterials, and current practice is to keep exposures as low as possible. Powdered nanomaterials have a greater potential for exposure, which can be reduced with a ventilation system, wet mopping, or a HEPA filter system. Dry mopping and compressed air are not used as they have the risk of spreading the exposure. Work processes must be documented. Respirators and other methods of avoiding lung and skin contact with nanomaterials are used in the absence of a complete investigation of the effect of nanomaterials on the skin. Without current occupational exposure limits, the focus is on practices such as measuring concentrations before and after material processing. Bayer is working on research and standardization for nanomaterial handling.
Archived Copy: Bayer-Code-of-Good-Practice-zum-Umgang-bei-Herstellung-und-On-Site-Gebrauch-von-Nanomaterialien_540_8265.pdf



Report Title: Guideline to Safe Manufacture and for Activities Involving Nanoparticles at Workplaces in BASF AG
Report ID: 539
Date: 3/1/2006
Author: BASF AG
Report Type: Guidance Document
URL: [BASF_Guide_to_safe_manufacture_and_for_activi.....]
Country: Germany
Organization: BASF AG
Summary: BASF AG, a German chemical company, published this guideline for its workers involved with products involving nanoparticle dust. It states that inhalation of nanoparticle dust can be a health hazard, and suggests protective measures. Because the value at which occupational exposure becomes hazardous is not yet known, workers should have their exposure restricted to that of the non-contaminated ambient air. On the other hand, the health risk for dermal exposure to nanoparticle dust is currently estimated as low and “suitable protective measures” should be taken. Nanoparticles should be manufactured in closed systems to the extent possible. If exposure is necessary, additional steps such as extractor systems should be implemented to reduce dust formation. Respiratory filters, gloves, and protective overalls are all effective at reducing exposure. Lastly, workplaces should be monitored for nanoparticle dust exposure in the number of particles and their size distribution.
Archived Copy: BASF_Guide_to_safe_manufacture_and_for_activities_involving_nanoparticles_539_3189.pdf



Report Title: Nanotechnology
Report ID: 529
Date: 6/1/2011
Report Type: Webpage
URL: [nanotechnology]
Country: Germany
Organization: TÜV SÜD Group
Summary: TÜV SÜD is a German corporation which provides technical consulting services. This website advertises their CENARIOS nanotechnology risk monitoring and assessment system. CENARIOS is composed of three modules. The first module identifies the current product and process-related risk inventory and reviews for health, environmental, and occupational safety risks. The second module examines risk trends and applies a prospective analysis to recognize future risk. The third module develops tools for crisis prevention and provides measures for professional risk management. This system is available for all corporations working with nanomaterials and who want to have TÜV SÜD analyze their risks.



Report Title: Guide for Dealing with Nano-Objects at Work
Report ID: 528
Date: 6/1/2010
Author: German Paint and Ink Manufacturers Association
Report Type: Guidance Document
URL: [127627Nanoleitfaden%20final%20Komplett.pdf]
Country: Germany
Organization: German Paint and Ink Manufacturers Association
Summary: This German-language document describes the usage of nanomaterials in the painting and ink industry (e.g. titanium dioxide pigments) and explains the risk assessment process, in the areas of delivery and storage, production, filling, performance testing of products, warehousing, and distribution. For workers, various protective measures are suggested in accordance with German government recommendations, such as ventilation systems and personal protection devices. For paint specifically, it is not expected that nanoparticles will pose a hazard unless paint is ground up. There are currently no special risks from nano-coatings which are known but further studies are under development.
Archived Copy: 127627Nanoleitfaden final Komplett_528_2728.pdf



Report Title: Legal Appraisal Of Nano Technologies
Report ID: 498
Date: 12/12/2008
Report Type: General Report
URL: [3198.pdf]
Country: Germany
Organization: Federal Environment Agency (UBA)
Summary: This report, conducted by the German Federal Environment Agency (UBA) in conjunction with universities, seeks to appraise the current nanotechnology legislation. The report aims to identify gaps in legislation at the German and EU level, point out possible regulatory approaches, and to formulate recommendations for further regulatory action. In German national law, the Federal Immission Control Act (BlmSchG) controls the production and industrial use of nanomaterials as part of a comprehensive industrial regulation. Marketing is regulated under the German Chemicals Act, which aims for the identification of substance-related risks and draws a distinction between naturally occurring substances and manufactured substances (such as nanoparticles). Nanoparticles may either be treated as existing substances subject to current regulations or as new substances under EU Directive 67/548/EEC. Regulations on transport, use, and disposal also show regulatory gaps which must be addressed.
Archived Copy: 3198_498_3746.pdf



Report Title: Nanotechnology for Mankind and Environment - Seize Upon Opportunities, Reduce Risks; Federal Environment Agency With Information on Environmental Aspects
Report ID: 412
Date: 10/12/2009
Author: Martin Ittershagen
Report Type: Press Release
URL: [pe09-075_nanotechnology_for_mankind_and_envir.....]
Country: Germany
Organization: Federal Environment Agency (UBA)
Summary: Nanotechnology is playing an ever greater role in the development of new products and applications. The rising use of synthetic nanomaterials in products, however, also leads to their increased input to the environmental media soil, water and air. There is as yet too little knowledge about the impact of nanomaterials on the environment and their potential health risks for humans. In response to this ignorance, the Federal Environment Agency (UBA) presents a background paper regarding relevant aspects of nanotechnology’s potential impacts on the environment. This includes identification of risks posed to mankind and the environment and recommendations for action. Among these recommendations are that any use of products that contain or might release nanomaterials should be avoided if at all possible as long as their effect on mankind and the environment is largely unknown. The UBA additionally maintains that there must a legal framework to ensure safe handling of nanomaterials, starting with a reporting system for nanomaterials in the form of a product directory.
Archived Copy: pe09-075_nanotechnology_for_mankind_and_environment_seize_upon_opportunities_reduce_risks_412_2614.pdf



Report Title: Guidance for Handling and Use of Nanomaterials at the Workplace
Report ID: 410
Date: 8/1/2007
Report Type: Government Report
URL: [guidance.pdf]
Country: Germany
Organization: German BAUA (Federal Institute for Occupational Safety and Health)
Summary: In spring 2006 the Federal Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (Bundesanstalt für Arbeitsschutz und Arbeitsmedizin/BAuA) and the German Chemical Industry Association (Verband der Chemischen Industrie/VCI) conducted, among VCI member companies, a joint survey on occupational health and safety in the handling and use of nanomaterials (document #406 on this database).

The purpose of the survey was to obtain an overview of occupational health and safety methods currently applied in the chemical industry in activities involving nanomaterials. A further aim was to develop, on the basis of the survey results, this "Guidance for Handling and Use of Nanomaterials at the Workplace" – with recommendations and operating instructions for the handling and use of nanomaterials in the chemical industry.

This Guidance wants to provide some orientation regarding measures in the production and use of nanomaterials at the workplace. The recommendations given here reflect the current state of science and technology. It is planned to adapt this Guidance to the advancing state of knowledge and to bring it in a more specific form, by mid-2008 at the latest.

See also a report on the results of the intiial questionnaire (document #407 in this database).
Archived Copy: BAuA_guidance_410_5955.pdf
See Also: 407, 408



Report Title: Nanotechnology: Health and Environmental Risks of Nanomaterials - -research Strategy
Report ID: 409
Date: 12/1/2007
Report Type: Government Report
URL: [research-strategy.pdf]
Country: Germany
Organization: German BAUA (Federal Institute for Occupational Safety and Health)
Summary: awfgasdg
Archived Copy: BAuA_research-strategy_409_6297.pdf
See Also: 406



Report Title: Questionnaire on Aspects of Worker Protection During the Production and Handling of
Report ID: 408
Date: 5/1/2006
Report Type: Questionnaire
URL: [questionnaire.pdf]
Country: Germany
Organization: German BAUA (Federal Institute for Occupational Safety and Health)
Summary: Questionnaire prepared by the German BAuA (Federal Institute for Occupational Safety and Health) to gauge potential exposure of workers who handle and process engineered nanomaterials.
Archived Copy: BAUA_questionnaire_408_7241.pdf
See Also: 407, 410



Report Title: Exposure to Nanomaterials in Germany
Report ID: 407
Date: 4/24/2008
Report Type: Project Report
URL: [survey.pdf]
Country: Germany
Organization: German BAUA (Federal Institute for Occupational Safety and Health)
Summary: Results of the survey conducted by the BAuA and the Association of the Chemical Industry, Germany (VCI), using questionnaires prepared by the BAuA seeking information on worker health and safety in the handling and processing of nanomaterials.
Archived Copy: BAuA_Exposuire to Nanomaterials in Germany_407_8540.pdf
See Also: 408, 410



Report Title: DRAFT: Nanotechnology: Health and Environmental Risks of Nanomaterials – Research Strategy –
Report ID: 406
Date: 8/1/2006
Report Type: Draft Report
URL: [draft-research-strategy.pdf]
Country: Germany
Organization: German BAUA (Federal Institute for Occupational Safety and Health)
Summary: This draft report, prepared in cooperation with the German Federal Environmental Agency (UBA) and the German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment, incorporates public comment from prior drafts into a new "Research Strategy" for investigating potential toxicology for workers who handle or process nanomaterials. The Research Strategy notes that no current laws in the EU require pre-market testing in part because it is unclear what testing would be required. Among numerous recommendations the Research Strategy suggests further research and data gathering on potential exposures of nanomaterials.

This draft report was placed online and public comment was taken over a period of a year and a final draft (Document 409 on this database) was published.
Archived Copy: BAuA_draft-research-strategy_406_5112.pdf
See Also: 409



Report Title: Nanotechnology: Opportunities and Risks for Humans and the Environment
Report ID: 385
Date: 8/1/2006
Report Type: Fact Finding Report
URL: [Nanotechnology%20Opportunities%20and%20Risks%.....]
Country: Germany
Organization: Federal Environment Agency (UBA)
Summary: Based on the available literature data, it has been assumed by the UBA that in the decades to come, nanotechnology will have a strong influence on essential industries such as the automotive, chemical and pharmaceutical industries as well as mechanical engineering, medicine, biotechnology and environmental engineering, and that it has a potential for fundamentally changing whole fields of technology. The Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) and the European Commission have responded to this in recent years by supporting a number of research projects. The UBA itself is determined to promote nanotechnology and needs more in-depth information. Specifically, nanotechnological methods and products have to be evaluated as to their advantages for the environment as compared to conventional alternatives, and the implications and possible risks of this very dynamic technology need to be identified and assessed such risks. Therefore, a research program has been proposed to the Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU) by the UBA in cooperation with other institutions. In addition, a study dedicated to the clarification of open questions has been commissioned to provide support for the UBA in the development of possible regulatory measures.
Archived Copy: Germany nanotechnology opportunities and risk_385_7590.pdf



Report Title: Nanotechnology: Health and environmental risks of nanomaterials - Research strategy
Report ID: 76
Date: 12/1/2007
Author: B. Orthen BAuA
Report Type: General Report
URL: [research-strategy.pdf]
Country: Germany
Summary: Current chemical regulations fail to include most nanomaterials in their scope. As consumers and producers of nanomaterials will be increasingly exposed to new types of materials, scientific research is required in order to create appropriate safety guidelines. This document describes the basis of a risk-oriented approach to nanotechnology research, the goal of which is to protect consumers, the environment, and occupational health. It highlights current regulations and existing research, and establishes a comprehensive research framework for supporting requisite future nanotechnology regulations. It includes guidelines for identification and testing of nanomaterials, and details which types and methods of toxicology studies are required to support such regulations.



 
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