United States of America Canada United States of America Mexico Bermuda St. Pierre et Miquelon St. Pierre et Miquelon Greenland Panama Aruba Barbados Bermuda Turks & Caicos Islands Cayman Islands Guatemala Belize Bahamas Haiti Costa Rica Puerto Rico Puerto Rico US Virgin Islands US Virgin Islands British Virgin Islands Trinidad & Tobago Netherlands Antilles Cuba Jamaica United States (Minor Outlying Islands) Dominican Republic Grenada St. Vincent & the Grenadines St. Lucia Martinique Dominica Guadeloupe Montserrat Antigua & Barbuda St. Kitts & Nevis Anguilla Nicaragua El Salvador Honduras Venezuela Ecuador Peru Chile Uruguay Colombia Suriname French Guiana Guyana Bolivia Paraguay Brazil Argentina South Georgia Falkland Islands Djibouti Eritrea Somalia Ethiopia Egypt Sudan Libya Tunisia Algeria Mauritania Gambia Gambia Senegal Burkina Faso Niger Mali Guinea-Bissau Guinea-Bissau Guinea Sierra Leone Sierra Leone Cote d'Ivoire Liberia Liberia Ghana Ghana Togo Togo Benin Benin Nigeria Cameroon Central African Republic Uganda Kenya Sao Tome & Principe Sao Tome & Principe Equatorial Guinea Equatorial Guinea Gabon Congo (Brazzaville) Congo, Democratic Republic Rwanda Burundi Rwanda Burundi Tanzania Angola Malawi Zambia Namibia Zimbabwe Botswana Swaziland Mozambique Malawi Lesotho Lesotho Madagascar Comoros Mauritius South Africa Chad Cape Verde Islands Seychelles Reunion St. Helena Morocco Western Sahara Portugal Spain Yemen Comoros Mayotte Mayotte Kuwait Qatar Bahrain Iran Cyprus Jordan Saudi Arabia Syria Egypt Armenia Turkey United Arab Emirates Oman Yemen Iraq Georgia Azerbaijan Lebanon Palestinian Authority Palestinian Authority Israel Azerbaijan Nepal Bhutan China North Korea South Korea Macao Brunei East Timor Singapore Singapore Laos Russia Japan Sri Lanka Hong Kong Philippines Malaysia Indonesia Kazakhstan Kyrgyzstan Uzbekistan Turkmenistan Tajikistan Afghanistan Mongolia Maldives China Pakistan India Bangladesh Thailand Burma (Myanmar) Laos Cambodia Cambodia Taiwan (Republic of China) Vietnam Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands British Indian Ocean Territory Australia New Zealand New Caledonia Vanuatu Fiji Tonga Hawai Pitcairn Island American Samoa Northern Marianas Islands Guam United States (Minor Outlying Islands) United States (Minor Outlying Islands) United States (Minor Outlying Islands) United States (Minor Outlying Islands) United States (Minor Outlying Islands) Nauru Tokelau Wallis & Futuna Islands Palau Samoa Niue Cook Islands Tuvalu Solomon Islands Australia Papua New Guinea Micronesia Marshall Islands Kiribati Norfolk Island French Polynesia Malta San Marino San Marino Andorra Andorra Liechtenstein Liechtenstein Faroe Islands Guernsey Guernsey Jersey Jersey Gibraltar Georgia Iceland Ireland United Kingdom Portugal Monaco Spain France Vatican City State (Holy See) Switzerland Belgium Netherlands Luxembourg Germany Denmark Norway Aland Islands Sweden Finland Czech Republic Austria Slovenia Italy Slovenia Croatia Croatia Slovakia Hungary Poland Serbia Macedonia Greece Cyprus Bulgaria Turkey Russia Lithuania Latvia Estonia Ukraine Russia Moldova Moldova Romania Bosnia & Herzegovina Bosnia & Herzegovina Belarus Albania Svalbard & Jan Mayen Islands Isle of Man Isle of Man Aland Islands Armenia Azerbaijan Azerbaijan Kazakhstan Montenegro
Home  |  Recent Documents   |  Add New Document   |  Search   |  Contact
You are logged out. Click here to Login  or Create New Account .
World
North America
South America
Central America
Europe
Asia
Africa
Middle East
Australia/Oceania
 
All Others
Swiss Federal Office for Public Health and Environment
TA-SWISS Center for Technology Assessment
Suva
TÜV SÜD Group
IMPART (Improving the understanding of the impact of nanoparticles on human health and the environme
The Innovation Society, Ltd.
Most Active:
European Union (179)
United States of America (80)
United Kingdom (39)
Australia (34)
Germany (25)
NGOs (12)
European Union
International Standa...
NGOs
United Nations

Aland Islands
Albania
Andorra
Armenia
Austria
Azerbaijan
Belarus
Belgium
Bosnia & Herzegovina
Bulgaria
Croatia
Cyprus
Czech Republic
Denmark
Estonia
Faroe Islands
Finland
France
Georgia
Germany
Gibraltar
Greece
Guernsey
Hungary
Iceland
Ireland
Isle of Man
Italy
Jersey
Kazakhstan
Latvia
Liechtenstein
Lithuania
Luxembourg
Macedonia
Malta
Moldova
Monaco
Montenegro
Netherlands
Norway
Poland
Portugal
Romania
Russia
San Marino
Serbia
Slovakia
Slovenia
Spain
Svalbard & Jan Mayen...
Sweden
Switzerland
Turkey
Ukraine
United Kingdom
Vatican City State (...
Switzerland


Report Title: Guidance Booklet on Safe Handling of Nanoparticles
Report ID: 579
Date: 10/27/2008
Author: D. McCormack, et al.
Report Type: Guidance Document
URL: [WP4_GuidanceBooklet_311008.pdf]
Country: Switzerland
Organization: IMPART (Improving the understanding of the impact of nanoparticles on human health and the environme
Summary: The European Community funded the IMPART project in order to improve the understanding of the impact of nanoparticles on human health and the environment. This booklet aims to provide a review of actual knowledge regarding the health risks and to make recommendations for the safe handling of nanoparticles in industry, government, and NGOs. It lists a number of EU reports included in the IMPART database (www.temas.ch/Impart/ImpartProj.nsf). Current knowledge has focused on ceramics, carbon nanotubes, quantum dots, and fullerenes. Hazards and toxicity of these have been investigated, at least in part, by some of these reports. While regulation covers potential nanoparticle risks in principle, knowledge must be improved before legislation can fully address the problem. Specifically, genotoxic effects, verification of oxidative stress as a marker for potential toxicity, interference of nanomaterials with the risk assessment tests, translocation of nanoparticles in the blood stream, dosimetrics modification by particle aggregation, and models to predict the full lifetime impact of nanoparticles are needed. In the absence of this data, current best practices have focused on conventional methods and practices of controlling exposure. There exist serious gaps which need to be addressed so that exposure can be precisely controlled in new methods. In the meantime, particular attention should be paid to poorly soluble particles with at least one diameter below 100nm, or aerosols, as these pose the greatest risks.
Archived Copy: WP4_GuidanceBooklet_311008_579_9587.pdf



Report Title: Factsheet on CENARIOS
Report ID: 545
Date: 6/1/2011
Author: TÜV SÜD
Report Type: Information Sheet
URL: [Factsheet_CENARIOS_deutsch_arial2.pdf]
Country: Switzerland
Organization: TÜV SÜD Group
Summary: This German-language fact sheet describes CENARIOS – the Certifiable Nano Specific Risk Management and Monitoring System. CENARIOS is the world’s first certified reproducible risk management and monitoring system specifically for nanotechnology. CENARIOS consists of three modules: Risk assessment/evaluation, risk monitoring, and issues management and communiciations. With the system, risks are evaluated based upon all available data, trends in risk are ascertained using current and prospective data, and crisis prevention is communicated to customers.
Archived Copy: Factsheet_CENARIOS_deutsch_arial2_545_2832.pdf



Report Title: Code of Conduct: Nanotechnologies
Report ID: 544
Date: 2/5/2008
Author: IG DHS
Report Type: Code of Conduct
URL: [CoC_Nanotechnologies_english.pdf]
Country: Switzerland
Organization: The Innovation Society, Ltd.
Summary: The Innovation Society, Ltd. is an international management and technology consulting company. They have adopted the nanotechnology Code of Conduct drawn up by the Swiss retailer’s association IG DHS. The Code is intended to provide maximum transparency to consumers of nanotechnology-utilizing products. First and foremost, product safety is the top priority. Only products considered harmless to humans, animals, and the environment may be produced. Members of IG DHS are responsible to actively seek information regarding nanomaterial safety and laws. In the event that nanomaterials are found to exist within a product and were not previously reported as such, the Code requires that manufacturers and suppliers be notified. Conversely, retail products which claim to use nanomaterials must actually contain them. Companies which manufacturer nanomaterial-utilizing products must consider risk management and must request information from their suppliers: Benefit or added value of the nanoproduct versus conventional product, evidence of the nano-specific effects, technical specifications, and risk potential.
Archived Copy: CoC_Nanotechnologies_english_544_3536.pdf



Report Title: Nanoparticles workplaces
Report ID: 530
Date: 9/1/2009
Author: Suva
Report Type: Brochure
URL: [nanopartikel_an_arbeitsplaetzen.pdf]
Country: Switzerland
Organization: Suva
Summary: This German-language document from Suva, a Swiss employee insurance company, is intended to inform the public about the current state of knowledge regarding nanomaterials and protective measures that are available. It defines nanomaterials, explains potential dangers such as combustibility, explains the precautionary principle, and describes precautionary measures that can be taken now even though exact hazards are still unknown. Materials can be substituted, collective protection can be implemented (e.g. dust-removing measures), individual protection can be worn, and hygiene can be used to prevent the spread of nanoparticles.
Archived Copy: nanopartikel_an_arbeitsplaetzen_530_5104.pdf



Report Title: Know Your Nano
Report ID: 187
Date: 1/1/2006
Author: TA-SWISS Center for Technology Assessment
Report Type: Brochure
URL: [TA_Swiss_nano_nano_e.pdf]
Country: Switzerland
Organization: TA-SWISS Center for Technology Assessment
Summary: Public opinion of nanotechnology is critical to its development. TA-SWISS, the Center for Center for Technology Assessment at the Swiss Science and Technology Council, is assessing the publics opinions on nanotechnology at evening meetings throughout Switzerland. This brochure contains background information for laymen at those meetings. It describes nanotechnologys attributes, potential uses and risks, and key Swiss parties in the safety debate. After the public meetings, TA-SWISS will report on the state of public opinion to the Swiss Parliament.
Archived Copy: Michael Vincent TA-SWISS (2002), Know your nano_187_1515.pdf



Report Title: Nanotechnology in the kitchen and in the shopping basket, abstract of the TA-SWISS study “Nanotechnology in the food sector”
Report ID: 120
Date: 1/1/2009
Report Type: Study Abstract
URL: [KF_Nano_im_Lebensmittelbereich.pdf]
Country: Switzerland
Organization: TA-SWISS Center for Technology Assessment
Summary: Nanotechnology holds much promise for the food industry through its ability to alter properties such as color, consistency, and caking. In Europe, synthetic nanoparticles are currently prohibited in food. Swiss law creates a whitelist of permitted food additives, each of which must be proven to be essential for production and safe for consumption. While the existing regulations adequately address additives, nanoparticles are now being incorporated in food packaging. This has raised questions regarding the ability of packaging nanoparticles to transfer to stored food, and whether such ingested nanoparticles pose a risk to humans. This document provides a trilingual, seven-page summary of the Swiss “Nanotechnology in the food sector” study. The study examines the current state of research, the laws, and public perception regarding nanoparticles in the food supply.



Report Title: Precautionary Matrix for Synthetic Nanomaterials, Version 1.0
Report ID: 96
Date: 3/12/2008
Report Type: Guidance Document
URL: [index.html]
Country: Switzerland
Organization: Swiss Federal Office for Public Health and Environment
Summary: As nanotechnology develops, the identification of risks is essential for public safety and effective regulation. The Swiss Federal Council's “Action Plan Synthetic Nanomaterials” called for the creation of a precautionary matrix for purposes of identifying possible risks in the production, usage, and disposal of nanomaterials. The matrix permits the estimation of risk specific to nanoparticles and excludes other conventional risks such as chemical toxicity. It indicates whether a particular combination of nanomaterial characteristics pose a risk to workers, consumers, the environment, or any combination thereof. This document contains the matrix itself which is usable in tabular form.



Report Title: Guidelines on the Precautionary Matrix for Synthetic Nanomaterials, Version 1.0
Report ID: 95
Date: 3/12/2008
Report Type: Guidance Document
URL: [index.html]
Country: Switzerland
Organization: Swiss Federal Office for Public Health and Environment
Summary: As nanotechnology develops, the identification of risks is essential for public safety and effective regulation. The Swiss Federal Council's “Action Plan Synthetic Nanomaterials” called for the creation of a precautionary matrix for purposes of identifying possible risks in the production, usage, and disposal of nanomaterials. The matrix permits the estimation of risk specific to nanoparticles and excludes other conventional risks such as chemical toxicity. This document explains the matrix and provides instructions on its required inputs and proper usage.



Report Title: Synthetic Nanomaterials, Action Plan, Report by the Federal Council of 9 April 2008
Report ID: 86
Date: 4/9/2008
Report Type: Government Report
URL: [div-4002-e]
Country: Switzerland
Organization: Swiss Federal Office for Public Health and Environment
Summary: On April 9, 2008, the Swiss Federal Council approved the “Action Plan Synthetic Nanomaterials.” This action plan creates the basis of a regulatory framework to ensure public safety, the first phase of which relies upon personal responsibility in the industry and self-supervision. The objectives of the plan are to create scientific research identifying and preventing harmful effects of nanoparticles, to promote public dialogue about the benefits and risks of nanotechnology, and to utilize existing promotional capabilities to market nanotechnology. This document contains an analysis of the current state of nanotechnology as well as a description of the plan.



 
Maps and boundary data are copyrighted by
FOTW - Flags Of The World web site