United States of America Canada United States of America Mexico Bermuda St. Pierre et Miquelon St. Pierre et Miquelon Greenland Panama Aruba Barbados Bermuda Turks & Caicos Islands Cayman Islands Guatemala Belize Bahamas Haiti Costa Rica Puerto Rico Puerto Rico US Virgin Islands US Virgin Islands British Virgin Islands Trinidad & Tobago Netherlands Antilles Cuba Jamaica United States (Minor Outlying Islands) Dominican Republic Grenada St. Vincent & the Grenadines St. Lucia Martinique Dominica Guadeloupe Montserrat Antigua & Barbuda St. Kitts & Nevis Anguilla Nicaragua El Salvador Honduras Venezuela Ecuador Peru Chile Uruguay Colombia Suriname French Guiana Guyana Bolivia Paraguay Brazil Argentina South Georgia Falkland Islands Djibouti Eritrea Somalia Ethiopia Egypt Sudan Libya Tunisia Algeria Mauritania Gambia Gambia Senegal Burkina Faso Niger Mali Guinea-Bissau Guinea-Bissau Guinea Sierra Leone Sierra Leone Cote d'Ivoire Liberia Liberia Ghana Ghana Togo Togo Benin Benin Nigeria Cameroon Central African Republic Uganda Kenya Sao Tome & Principe Sao Tome & Principe Equatorial Guinea Equatorial Guinea Gabon Congo (Brazzaville) Congo, Democratic Republic Rwanda Burundi Rwanda Burundi Tanzania Angola Malawi Zambia Namibia Zimbabwe Botswana Swaziland Mozambique Malawi Lesotho Lesotho Madagascar Comoros Mauritius South Africa Chad Cape Verde Islands Seychelles Reunion St. Helena Morocco Western Sahara Portugal Spain Yemen Comoros Mayotte Mayotte Kuwait Qatar Bahrain Iran Cyprus Jordan Saudi Arabia Syria Egypt Armenia Turkey United Arab Emirates Oman Yemen Iraq Georgia Azerbaijan Lebanon Palestinian Authority Palestinian Authority Israel Azerbaijan Nepal Bhutan China North Korea South Korea Macao Brunei East Timor Singapore Singapore Laos Russia Japan Sri Lanka Hong Kong Philippines Malaysia Indonesia Kazakhstan Kyrgyzstan Uzbekistan Turkmenistan Tajikistan Afghanistan Mongolia Maldives China Pakistan India Bangladesh Thailand Burma (Myanmar) Laos Cambodia Cambodia Taiwan (Republic of China) Vietnam Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands British Indian Ocean Territory Australia New Zealand New Caledonia Vanuatu Fiji Tonga Hawai Pitcairn Island American Samoa Northern Marianas Islands Guam United States (Minor Outlying Islands) United States (Minor Outlying Islands) United States (Minor Outlying Islands) United States (Minor Outlying Islands) United States (Minor Outlying Islands) Nauru Tokelau Wallis & Futuna Islands Palau Samoa Niue Cook Islands Tuvalu Solomon Islands Australia Papua New Guinea Micronesia Marshall Islands Kiribati Norfolk Island French Polynesia Malta San Marino San Marino Andorra Andorra Liechtenstein Liechtenstein Faroe Islands Guernsey Guernsey Jersey Jersey Gibraltar Georgia Iceland Ireland United Kingdom Portugal Monaco Spain France Vatican City State (Holy See) Switzerland Belgium Netherlands Luxembourg Germany Denmark Norway Aland Islands Sweden Finland Czech Republic Austria Slovenia Italy Slovenia Croatia Croatia Slovakia Hungary Poland Serbia Macedonia Greece Cyprus Bulgaria Turkey Russia Lithuania Latvia Estonia Ukraine Russia Moldova Moldova Romania Bosnia & Herzegovina Bosnia & Herzegovina Belarus Albania Svalbard & Jan Mayen Islands Isle of Man Isle of Man Aland Islands Armenia Azerbaijan Azerbaijan Kazakhstan Montenegro
Home  |  Recent Documents   |  Add New Document   |  Search   |  Contact
You are logged out. Click here to Login  or Create New Account .
World
North America
South America
Central America
Europe
Asia
Africa
Middle East
Australia/Oceania
 
All Others
Australian Government Department of Industry, Tourism and Resources
Department of Health and Ageing, Therapeutic Goods Administration (Australian government)
Legislative Council (of New South Wales, Australia), Standing Committee on State Development
National Nanotechnology Strategy Taskforce
Prime Minister's Science, Engineering, and Innovation Council (PMSEIC)
Senate Community Affairs References Committee Secretariat (Australian Senate)
Standing Committee on State Development (Sydney, New South Wales)
The Australian Office of Nanotechnology
The National Academies Forum for the National Nanotechnology Strategy Taskforce
Australian Office of Nanotechnology
Invest Australia
Safe Work Australia
Australian Academy of Science
Department of Innovation, Industry, Science and Research (DIISR) (Australian Government)
NanoSafe Australia
Most Active:
European Union (179)
United States of America (80)
United Kingdom (39)
Australia (34)
Germany (25)
NGOs (12)
European Union
International Standa...
NGOs
United Nations

American Samoa
Australia
Cook Islands
Fiji
French Polynesia
Guam
Hawai
Kiribati
Marshall Islands
Micronesia
Nauru
New Caledonia
New Zealand
Niue
Norfolk Island
Northern Marianas Islands
Palau
Papua New Guinea
Pitcairn Island
Samoa
Solomon Islands
Tokelau
Tonga
Tuvalu
United States (Minor...
Vanuatu
Wallis & Futuna Islands
Australia


Report Title: Current OHS Best Practices for the Australian Nanotechnology Industry
Report ID: 532
Date: 11/1/2007
Author: NanoSafe Australia Network
Report Type: Position Paper
URL: [72nuxiavskpg.pdf]
Country: Australia
Organization: NanoSafe Australia
Summary: NanoSafe Australia was established in 2006 and is a group of Australian toxicologists and risk assessors who have formed a network to address nanotechnology health and safety issues. This position paper begins with a background of the Australian nanotechnology industry and existing regulations. Four different federal agencies are responsible for the introduction of new chemicals, depending on whether they are used for agricultural, food additive, medical, or industrial purposes. For industrial chemicals, the regulatory scheme is currently assessment only (not registration-based), while for the other three areas, both assessment and product registration are required. These present processes rely heavily upon the composition of chemicals, but fail to recognize the differences between nanomaterials and traditional forms of the same material. This gap must be addressed. The paper also discusses the issues surrounding nanomaterial exposure, including methods for limiting exposure such as personal protective equipment.
Archived Copy: 72nuxiavskpg_532_3444.pdf



Report Title: Developing Workplace Detection and Measurement Techniques for Carbon Nanotubes
Report ID: 517
Date: 6/1/2010
Report Type: Research Report
URL: [DevelopingWorkplaceDetectionandMeasurementTec.....]
Country: Australia
Organization: Safe Work Australia
Summary: As part of an initiative to ensure that nanomaterials are safely developed, this report investigates methods of detecting airborne carbon nanotubes. Very fine multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) are used in the manufacture of carbon nanotube electrodes and yarns. Investigators measured potential nanoparticle release in a carbon nanotube yarn production facility, but were unable to determine if any loose airborne nanotubes were released. Concentrations of nanotubes below one fiber per milliliter of air may be difficult to measure. To determine the efficacy of detection methods, carbon nanotube aerosol was also intentionally created by nebulizing nanotube dispersions. Electrostatic Low-Pressure Impactors (ELPI) were successful at detecting airborne nanotubes at concentrations of 20 fibers per milliliter. Further research is needed on whether airborne nanotubes are emitted during manufacturing processes and on improving detection methods to a concentration of one fiber per milliliter.
Archived Copy: DevelopingWorkplaceDetectionandMeasurementTechniquesforCarbonNanotubes-1_517_5341.pdf



Report Title: An Evaluation of MSDS and Labels Associated With the Use of Engineered Nanomaterials
Report ID: 516
Date: 6/1/2010
Author: Safe Work Australia
Report Type: General Report
URL: [AnEvaluationofMSDSandLabelsassociatedwiththeu.....]
Country: Australia
Organization: Safe Work Australia
Summary: This report contains an evaluation of fifty Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) and fifteen labels for products containing engineered nanomaterials. It is intended to consider how information on MSDS and labels reflects the current knowledge level concerning hazards, risks, and controls of nanotechnology. Companies were contacted directly for the MSDS and labels, in addition to obtaining them through internet searches and existing literature. The evaluation checklist examined whether the information obtained was reliable, relevant to nanomaterials, and accurate. Only 18% of MSDS provided a sufficiently accurate description to permit an occupational risk assessment. For carbon nanotubes, eleven out of twelve MSDS defined the hazards to be those of ordinary graphite. This is contrary to current scientific knowledge that nanotubes pose a greater health risk than large-sized carbon. Recommended handling and protection procedures also varied greatly across products. Overall, the report concludes that MSDS and labels must improve the quality and reliability of information.
Archived Copy: AnEvaluationofMSDSandLabelsassociatedwiththeuseofengineerednanomaterials_June_2010_516_1570.pdf



Report Title: Nanotechnology in Australia: Trends, applications and collaborative opportunities
Report ID: 457
Date: 12/1/2009
Report Type: General Report
URL: [nanotechnology09.pdf]
Country: Australia
Organization: Australian Academy of Science
Summary: This report from the Australian Academy of Science summarizes the state of Australian nanotechnology in 2009, including a survey of research trends and collaboration networks, as well as an analysis of Nanotechnology Stakeholder Day (September 25, 2009) where forty attendees met to discuss nanotechnology research in Australia. From the input of the nanotechnology community, the report makes eight recommendations to support future Australian nanotechnology research: The Australian Government should lead a National Strategic Plan for Nanotechnology Research developed in consultation with stakeholders, long-term funding should be allocated to an integrated nanotechnology network representing research and industry needs and whose participants would develop and implement the National Strategic Plan for Nanotechnology Research, there should be a single national support system for international collaboration, all levels of government should fund nanotechnology infrastructure and equipment, funding agencies should expand beyond supporting basic research and should also encourage market-driven research, the Australian Government should establish a nanotechnology entrepreneurial fellowship scheme, all levels of government should maintain support and funding mechanisms for Australian-based nanotechnology collaborations, and all levels of government should continue their efforts to develop science-based regulation.
Archived Copy: nanotechnology09_457_8671.pdf



Report Title: National Enabling Technologies Strategy
Report ID: 456
Date: 2/1/2010
Report Type: Government Report
URL: [NETS_booklet_web.pdf]
Country: Australia
Organization: Department of Innovation, Industry, Science and Research (DIISR) (Australian Government)
Summary: The Australian Government, as part of its newly announced Super Science – Future Industries Initiative which invests in biotechnology, nanotechnology, and communications technology research infrastructure, has established the National Enabling Technologies Strategy (NETS). This Strategy builds on the work of the 2000-2008 National Biotechnology Strategy and the 2007-2009 National Nanotechnology Strategy, and will continue to provide a framework to support the responsible development of "enabling technologies." The themes and objectives of the Strategy are a national approach (Federal, State, and Territory levels); balancing risk/reward through an understanding of health, safety, environmental, social, and economic considerations; developing nanotechnology measurement capabilities through the National Measurement Institute (NMI), increasing public understanding of enabling technologies, including nanotechnology; increasing government, industry, and community awareness of the potential beneficial applications of enabling technologies and how they will address global challenges and increase productivity; and the Strategy will assist stakeholders in preparing for new technologies by supporting the development of policy and regulatory frameworks.
Archived Copy: NETS_booklet_web_456_1491.pdf



Report Title: Attachment 7: Proposed Model for a Mandatory Notification and Assessment
Report ID: 424
Date: 11/1/2009
Author: National Industrial Chemicals Assessment and Notification Scheme
Report Type: Background Document
URL: [Attachment_7_PDF.pdf]
Country: Australia
Organization: Department of Health and Ageing, Therapeutic Goods Administration (Australian government)
Summary: The following attachment contains a proposed model for the mandatory notification and assessment program as described in NICNAS’s Proposal for Regulatory Reform of Industrial Nanomaterials Public Discussion Paper.
Archived Copy: Attachment_7_PDF_424_2615.pdf



Report Title: Attachment 6: Proposed Strategy for Nano-forms of New-chemicals
Report ID: 423
Date: 11/1/2009
Author: National Industrial Chemicals Notification and Assessment Scheme
Report Type: Background Document
URL: [Attachment_6_PDF.pdf]
Country: Australia
Organization: Department of Health and Ageing, Therapeutic Goods Administration (Australian government)
Summary: The following attachment contains tables and drawings that illustrate the current regulatory framework for industrial nanomaterials in Australia. Elaborated, this consists of the provisions for new chemicals used in research and development under The Industrial Chemicals Notification and Assessment Act 1989, a summary of the permit categories for regulation of industrial nanomaterials under NICNAS, the proposal for regulation of industrial nanomaterials under NICNAS certificate categories, and a proposed strategy for requesting particle size distribution information for permit and certificate categories.
Archived Copy: Attachment_6_PDF_423_6363.pdf



Report Title: Attachment 5: Overview of NICNAS New Chemical Notification Categories
Report ID: 422
Date: 11/1/2009
Author: National Industrial Chemicals Notification and Assessment
Report Type: Background Document
URL: [Attachment_5_PDF.pdf]
Country: Australia
Organization: Department of Health and Ageing, Therapeutic Goods Administration (Australian government)
Summary: This attachment contains an overview of NICNAS two new chemical notification categories. The first, permit notification, is suitable for chemicals which meet certain criteria and result in the issue of a permit allowing the introduction of fixed quantities of the chemical for the duration of the permit. The certificate notification, which is the second, is intended for chemicals which do not meet the permit criteria or where the introducer prefers a certificate notification to a permit notification. Certificate categories result in an assessment report, the issue of an assessment certificate, and public publication of the assessed chemical. Additionally, a chemical that has been formally assessed by NICNAS, either as a new or existing chemical, may necessitate a secondary notification assessment due to changed circumstances. The procedure for such reassessment is set in place by Section 64 of the Industrial Chemicals (Notification and Assessment) Act (1989).
Archived Copy: Attachment_5_PDF_422_5015.pdf



Report Title: Attachment 4: Overview of International Activities Addressing Regulation of Industrial Nanomaterials
Report ID: 421
Date: 11/1/2009
Author: National Industrial Chemicals Notification and Assessment
Report Type: Background Document
URL: [Attachment_4_PDF.pdf]
Country: Australia
Organization: Department of Health and Ageing, Therapeutic Goods Administration (Australian government)
Summary: The following attachment contains overviews of the regulation of industrial nanomaterials from the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, and the European Union’s REACH regulatory schema.
Archived Copy: Attachment_4_PDF_421_7062.pdf



Report Title: Attachment 3: Summary of Findings from Review of the Possible Impacts of Nanotechnology on Australia’s Regulatory Framework
Report ID: 420
Date: 11/1/2009
Author: National Industrial Chemicals Notification and Assessment Scheme
Report Type: Background Document
URL: [Attachment_3_PDF.pdf]
Country: Australia
Organization: Department of Health and Ageing, Therapeutic Goods Administration (Australian government)
Summary: Australia’s federal regulatory frameworks are generally well suited to allowing adequate management and control of risks posed by engineered nanomaterials (NM) and products incorporating NM, and their manufacture, use and handling. This review found that there was no case where a particular regulatory framework generally did not apply to a nanofamily as a result of the presence of NMs. Further, the application generally of the federal regulatory frameworks to NMs and products in the nanofamilies meant that regulation throughout the whole of the lifecycle of these materials is largely the same as for conventional products. However, the general repercussions of such applications were also the same as for conventional products; some regulatory regimes involve regulatory approval prior to undertaking the particular regulated activity. This, in tur, meant that steps not required to be taken under particular regulatory frameworks were also not taken for NMs. Nevertheless, some gaps were found where the regulatory frameworks either do not apply at all to NMs and products incorporating them or do not apply to NMs or nanoproducts as appropriately as they apply to conventional products in the same families.
Archived Copy: Attachment_3_PDF_420_2280.pdf



Report Title: Attachment 2 - Indicative List of Nanomaterials.
Report ID: 419
Date: 11/1/2009
Author: National Industrial Chemicals Notification and Assessment Scheme
Report Type: Background Document
URL: [Attachment_2_PDF.pdf]
Country: Australia
Organization: Department of Health and Ageing, Therapeutic Goods Administration (Australian government)
Summary: This attachment contains an indicative, but by no means exhaustive, list of substances that the National Industrial Chemicals Notification and Assessment Scheme considers to be produced as industrial nanomaterials.
Archived Copy: Attachment_2_PDF_419_9730.pdf



Report Title: Attachment 1: Overarching Principles of the NICNAS Regulatory Strategy
Report ID: 418
Date: 11/1/2009
Author: National Industrial Chemicals Notification and Assessment Scheme
Report Type: Background Document
URL: [Attachment_1_PDF.pdf]
Country: Australia
Organization: Department of Health and Ageing, Therapeutic Goods Administration (Australian government)
Summary: This attachment highlights essential principles for managing the risks posed by new technologies (including nanotechnology) to health and safety of people and the environment. Chief among them is reviewing the ability of the existing regulatory framework to deliver an efficient and effective response to the new technology while also being mindful that any risk from use of the nano-form of a chemical is no greater than that posed by the conventional form of the chemical or it is at or below the level of acceptable risk. Equally important is a second principle, that in managing risk one should make use of the best scientific evidence available for risk based assessment of the impacts of the new technology on human health and the environment, including the ability to review decisions as new scientific evidence becomes available. Finally, where best available scientific evidence is insufficient to support the safety of the product/chemical, measures to protect public health and safety and the environment can be adopted.
Archived Copy: Attachment_1_PDF_418_7501.pdf



Report Title: Engineered Nanomaterials: Evidence on the Effectiveness of Workplace Controls to Prevent Exposure
Report ID: 414
Date: 11/1/2009
Author: Dr. Neale Jackson, Dr. Andreas Lopata, Terry Elms, Paul Wright
Report Type: Fact Finding Report
URL: [EffectivenessReport.pdf]
Country: Australia
Organization: Safe Work Australia
Summary: This literature review has brought together and evaluated evidence on the effectiveness of workplace controls to prevent or minimize exposure to engineered nanomaterials. Only workplace settings such as laboratories, pilot plants and production plants have been considered; environmental safety and consumer product safety were not considered.
The review has determined that there is evidence that control and risk management methodologies which are already known can provide levels of protection for workers from exposure to engineered nanomaterials in the occupational environment. Further testing and data is needed in specific workplace situations to understand the levels of protection afforded, and ensure effectiveness. With that said, there is a lack of health effects data currently available for many engineered nanomaterials which therefore necessitates a precautionary approach to the prevention and control of workplace exposures should be used. However, once data about the health and safety risks have been determined and defined, the principle of ‘As Low As Reasonably Practicable’ (ALARP) can be adopted.
Archived Copy: EffectivenessReport_414_5638.pdf



Report Title: Proposal for Regulatory Reform of Industrial; Public Discussion Paper
Report ID: 413
Date: 11/1/2009
Author: National Industrial Chemicals Notification and Assessment Scheme
Report Type: Concept Paper
URL: [NICNAS_Nano_PUBLIC_DISCUSSION_PAPER_PDF.pdf]
Country: Australia
Organization: Department of Health and Ageing, Therapeutic Goods Administration (Australian government)
Summary: This paper provides NICNAS’s stakeholders (the community, industry and government) with the opportunity to comment to NICNAS on a reform initiative to introduce new approaches to the regulation of industrial nanomaterials. The proposal utilizes the existing NICNAS framework, and proposes some adjustments to address uncertainties in potential risks posed by these novel materials to health, safety and the environment. The proposal addresses three elements: regulation of nanoforms of new chemicals, regulation of nanoforms of existing chemicals, and the principle of an integrated approach for industrial nanomaterials within the NICNAS framework as a longer term strategy. As part of this paper, NICNAS is seeking input from stakeholders regarding whether it provides for the sound management of industrial nanomaterials and whether it establishes a clear, regulatory framework for ensuring public health, worker safety, and environmental standards.
Archived Copy: NICNAS_Nano_PUBLIC_DISCUSSION_PAPER_PDF_413_8973.pdf



Report Title: Engineered Nanomaterials: A Review of the Toxicology and Health Hazards
Report ID: 411
Date: 11/1/2009
Author: Toxikos Pty Ltd
Report Type: Advisory Report
URL: [ToxicologyReview_Nov09.pdf]
Country: Australia
Organization: Safe Work Australia
Summary: This review reports the current understanding of the toxicology and health hazards associated with engineered nanomaterials, and the implications in regard to health hazards in occupational settings (i.e. during manufacture, handling, and use). It updates a previous review by the Australian Safety and Compensation Council. The information in this review is based on scientific literature published from 2006 to 2008, however, during the editorial phase some important publications from the first half of 2009 have been incorporated.
Archived Copy: ToxicologyReview_Nov09_411_2467.pdf



Report Title: Victoria Nanotechnology Statement: Taking Leadership in Innovations in Technology
Report ID: 223
Date: 2/1/2008
Author: State Government of Victoria, Australia
Report Type: Statement
URL: [2008%20nanotechnology%20statement.pdf]
Country: Australia
Summary: Victoria’s 2008 Nanotechnology Statement provides a framework for coordinating and consolidating existing capabilities and resources in nanotechnology to accelerate Victoria’s transformation into a forward-looking, knowledge-based economy. It also provides a framework of priorities for a new strategic partnership between government, industry bodies, industry and the research sector and a basis for action to ensure that we capture the substantial health, economic and environmental benefits that global developments in nanotechnology are generating.
Archived Copy: 2008%20nanotechnology%20statement_223_2710.pdf



Report Title: Nanotechnology Australian Capability Report
Report ID: 190
Date: 5/1/2007
Author: Invest Australia
Report Type: Government Report
URL: [NANOREPORT07%20Final.pdf]
Country: Australia
Organization: Invest Australia
Summary: Invest Australia, the Australian governments investment agency, commissioned this report to encourage foreign direct investment in Australian nanotechnology. Government programs such as the Backing Australias Ability Strategy and the National Nanotechnology Strategy have multi-billion dollar funding and support collaboration between research organizations and private corporations. A new tax concession encourages multinationals to invest in Australian research and development, even if the resulting intellectual property is held offshore. Consortiums between universities, government, and private companies, such as the Nanotechnology Victoria consortium, are creating a strong R&D network while fostering commercial nanotech products. Meanwhile, according to the report, business restrictions are few and Australias patent and copyright protection scheme is considered to be one of the best in the world. The majority of this document enumerates organizations engaged in research or product development, categorized by area: Materials; Nano-biotechnology and Medical Devices; Energy and Environment; Electronics and Photonics; Quantum Technology; Instrumentation and Software; Facilities, Networks, and Associations; and a matrix showing organizational efforts across these categories.
Archived Copy: Michael Vincent Invest Australia (2008), Nanotech Report_190_7137.pdf



Report Title: Australian Office of Nanotechnology
Report ID: 177
Date: 7/11/2008
Author: Australian Office of Nanotechnology
Report Type: Webpage
Publication: Website
URL: [AustralianOfficeofNanotechnology.aspx]
Country: Australia
Organization: Australian Office of Nanotechnology
Summary: The webpage of the Australian Office of Nanotechnology contains an introduction to nanotechnology and the Australian National Nanotechnology Strategy. The National Nanotechnology Strategy began on July 2007 and includes a Health, Safety, and Environmental (HSE) Working Group, a Public Awareness and Engagement Program, and the procurement of an atomic force microscope for the National Measurement Institute to scientifically develop nanoscale standards. The page also contains a hyperlinked list of publications and fact sheets.
Archived Copy: Michael Vincent AON (2008), Australian Office of Nanotechnology_177_6738.pdf



Report Title: Victorian Nanotechnology Statement: Taking Leadership in Innovations in Technology
Report ID: 166
Date: 2/1/2008
Author: State Government of Victoria, Australia
Report Type: Concept Paper
URL: [2008%20nanotechnology%20statement.pdf]
Country: Australia
Summary: Victorias 2008 Nanotechnology Statement provides a framework for coordinating and consolidating existing capabilities and resources in nanotechnology to accelerate Victorias transformation into a forward-looking, knowledge-based economy. It also provides a framework of priorities for a new strategic partnership between government, industry bodies, industry and the research sector and a basis for action to ensure that they capture the substantial health, economic and environmental benefits that global developments in nanotechnology are generating.
Archived Copy: 2008 nanotechnology statement_166_2032.pdf



Report Title: Updated Arrangements for Approved Uv Filters and Assessment of New Uv Filters Used in Cosmetics
Report ID: 165
Date: 10/7/2008
Author: Government of Australia: Department of Ageing and National Industrial Chemical Notification and Assessment Scheme
Report Type: Guidance Document
URL: [2008oct_whole.pdf]
Country: Australia
Organization: Department of Health and Ageing, Therapeutic Goods Administration (Australian government)
Summary: The purpose of this notice is to advise companies of the notification and assessment requirements for UV filters in cosmetic products that fall within the scope of the Industrial Chemicals Notification and Assessment Act 1989. The National Industrial Chemical Notification and Assessment Scheme (NICNAS) had received enquiries regarding the notification requirements for UV filters in cosmetic products. In January 2007 NICNAS published in the Chemical Gazette a notice describing new arrangements for UV filters proposed for use in cosmetic products as well as products covered under the former Cosmetic Interim Arrangement. These legislative changes resulted in the introduction of a Cosmetic Standard which describes the regulatory requirements for six cosmetic product categories with much attention placed on product categories containing sunscreens.



Archived Copy: 2008oct_whole_165_2476.pdf



Report Title: Proposed Amendments to Part 3 of the FSANZ Application Handbook
Report ID: 155
Date: 10/1/2008
Author: Food Standards Australia New Zealand
Report Type: Legislation
URL: [Proposed%20Amendments%20to%20Application%20Ha.....]
Country: Australia
Summary: Passed by the Australian Parliament in 1991, The Food Standards Australia New Zealand Act established the Food Standards Australia New Zealand (FSANZ) as an independent statutory agency to develop standards for the two countries. Since the passage of that legislation, numerous amendments to further clarify existing regulations have been passed. The amendments contained herein are proposed variations to guidelines in Part 3 of the FSANZ Application Handbook which was originally registered as a legislative instrument on 1 August 2007. These amendments ensure that information on the identity and purity of substances in applications for food additives, processing aids, nutritive substances and novel foods is adequate to properly define and assess the chemical entity for which approval is sought. This includes information on the functional relationship between particle size, size distribution and morphology and insight into the physico-chemical properties of function, thereby further reinforcing the provision of this information under the specifications for identity and purity. Most importantly, these amendments make clear that an applicant must provide information on particle size and morphology in cases where these characteristics may relate to the toxicity of a food contaminant. In future, it may be necessary to specify different physical forms of some particulate food contaminants in order to properly assess, define, and set safe limits.
Archived Copy: Proposed Amendments to Application Handbookoct 20081_155_4757.pdf



Report Title: National Nanotechnology Strategy (NNS) Annual Report 2007-08
Report ID: 128
Date: 1/30/2009
Report Type: Government Report
URL: [NNS%20Annual%20report.pdf]
Country: Australia
Organization: Australian Office of Nanotechnology
Summary: The Australian National Nanotechnology Strategy (NNS) requires the issuance of an annual report covering the current state of the Strategys implementation (as compared to the Strategys Implementation Plan) as well as the nanotechnology industry in general. This document contains the first annual report, spanning July 1, 2007 to June 30, 2008. It reports on the financial status of Australian nanotechnology support, the progress of the NNS, and any other nanotechnology activities occurring within the country. Additionally, it provides background information about nanotechnology and general information regarding Australias present nanotechnology capabilities.



Report Title: Social Inclusion and Engagement Workshop Report
Report ID: 123
Date: 12/1/2008
Report Type: Workshop Report
URL: [SocialInclusionandEngagementWorkshopFinalRepo.....]
Country: Australia
Organization: The Australian Office of Nanotechnology
Summary: The Social Inclusion and Engagement Workshop was held on December 1, 2008. Hosted by the Australian Office of Nanotechnology, the workshop focused on social inclusion and stakeholder engagement. Forty-five representatives from government, industry, researchers, community agencies, and change agents attended with the goal of ensuring that nanotechnology developments incorporate feedback from all stakeholders (those affected directly or indirectly by nanotechnology). All groups involved agreed that more communication was needed between government, industry, researchers, and the public. This document summarizes the workshop, its key points, discussions, commitments, and lists its participants.



Report Title: A review of the scientific literature on the safety of nanoparticulate titanium dioxide or zinc oxide in sunscreens
Report ID: 121
Date: 1/16/2006
Report Type: Summary Article
URL: [sunscreen-zotd.pdf]
Country: Australia
Organization: Department of Health and Ageing, Therapeutic Goods Administration (Australian government)
Summary: This Australian government article summarizes existing research regarding the safety of nanoparticle sunscreens containing zinc oxide or titanium dioxide. The use of nanoparticles on the human skin has been identified as potentially dangerous. This document summarizes 24 scientific studies relating to nanoparticles and the skin. It finds some studies linking exposure to zinc oxide and titanium dioxide to free radical production and adverse effects. Other studies involving dermal penetration found that these nanoparticles did not penetrate into lower levels of the skin. Based upon the research summarized, the report concludes that nanoparticles in sunscreens remain on the surface (outer dead layer) of the skin and thus do not pose a health hazard.



Report Title: Environmental, Social, Legal, and Ethical Aspects of the Development of Nanotechnologies in Australia
Report ID: 118
Date: 4/1/2006
Report Type: Research Report
URL: [NanoreportNAF27June.pdf]
Country: Australia
Organization: The National Academies Forum for the National Nanotechnology Strategy Taskforce
Summary: The Australian National Nanotechnology Strategy Taskforce commissioned the National Academies Forum to provide expert opinions on environmental, social, legal, and ethical issues stemming from nanotechnology. This report details the state of the nanotechnology industry, identifies such issues, and makes recommendations. For example, areas such as nanoelectronics and nanophotonics do not present significant risk during fabrication and use, but new regulations may be needed to address disposal. Other areas, such as nanobiotechnology, may have higher risks and these applications should be limited until sufficient research has been completed. Legal and ethical issues are also discussed, including the potential future use of nanomaterials to create human performance enhancing implants.



Report Title: A Review of Possible Impacts of Nanotechnology on Australia's Regulatory Framework
Report ID: 117
Date: 9/1/2007
Author: Karinne Ludlow, Diana Bowman, and Graeme Hodge
Report Type: Research Report
URL: [MonashReport2008.pdf]
Country: Australia
Summary: The Australian National Nanotechnology Strategy Taskforce commissioned an independent report on the suitability of the current regulatory framework for managing nanotechnology. This report is the findings of the independent consultants, which concludes that Australian regulations are well-suited to regulating nanotechnology and that many current regulations could be used to regulate nanomaterials. However, the major area of concern are “regulatory triggers,” which were found to be inadequate for controlling nanomaterials. Data on nanomaterials is currently very limited which often permits them to bypass regulatory control. Thresholds of volume, toxicity, or human risk which trigger regulatory controls on most materials are not triggered when nanomaterials lack these supporting data. The report suggests that long-term amending of Australian laws will be required as data become available.



Report Title: New Inquiry into Nanotechnology in NSW
Report ID: 113
Date: 12/12/2007
Report Type: Press Release
Country: Australia
Organization: Legislative Council (of New South Wales, Australia), Standing Committee on State Development
Summary: The Standing Committee on State Development of the Legislative Council of New South Wales, Australia announced the formation of an inquiry into nanotechnology on December 12, 2007. This document is the original press release announcing the inquiry. This inquiry sought to raise awareness of nanotechnology issues and to examine existing and potential future regulations to ensure that they adequately address the new risks that nanomaterials pose to workers and consumers. Written submissions were encouraged from scientists, corporations, and the general public.



Report Title: Nanotechnology: Enabling technologies for Australian innovative industries
Report ID: 90
Date: 3/11/2005
Report Type: Government White Paper
URL: [nanotechnology_pmseic110305.pdf]
Country: Australia
Organization: Prime Minister's Science, Engineering, and Innovation Council (PMSEIC)
Summary: Expected advances in the area of nanotechnology provide a substantial opportunity for Australia to participate in the development of new technologies. Nanotechnology will transform Australia's industries but also create social and safety issues that require addressing. This white paper from an Australian government working group identifies the requirements for Australia to fully embrace nanotechnology. It recommends the establishment of a national nanotechnology strategy to provide an appropriate regulatory framework and manage safety issues. It also underscores the long-term support of nanotechnology research required to foster new developments. The present state of the nanotechnology industry is viewed as being similar to that of the biotechnology industry of 5-10 years ago, and supporting nanotechnology is essential for Australia to possess a leadership position over the next few years. Such support must be through government organizations, business alliances, and research funding.



Report Title: Nanotechnology: Occupational Health and Safety Overview
Report ID: 85
Date: 5/1/2007
Author: WorkCover NSW
Report Type: Government Report
URL: [nanotechnology_overview_may_2007_5309.pdf]
Country: Australia
Summary: This report, produced by the government of New South Wales in Australia, briefly summarizes the current status of occupational risks from nanotechnology. The greater reactivity of nanoparticles creates new risks of toxicity, combustibility, and other hazards which are not well understood. The report lists present deficiencies in nanotechnology regulation and knowledge, including the lack of a detailed risk assessment, measurement standards, and worker exposure standards. It notes the failure of existing regulations to include nanomaterials in their scope and highlights the relevant issues within the areas of workers compensation, public communication, and regulation.



Report Title: Nanotechnology in New South Wales
Report ID: 84
Date: 10/1/2008
Report Type: Government Report
URL: [60CE9A9B34382DC5CA2573AA00045168]
Country: Australia
Organization: Standing Committee on State Development (Sydney, New South Wales)
Summary: The National Nanotechnology Strategy seeks to ensure that Australia will develop nanotechnology in a productive and socially responsible manner. As part of this strategy, The Standing Committee on State Development held an inquiry as to the capability of the Australian regulatory frameworks to manage the new issues of nanotechnology. This report contains the findings and conclusions of the committee. A broad range of issues were addressed, including possible moratoriums, regulatory clarity, occupational health and safety, labeling requirements, nanotoxicology research, and the coordination of science research. Recommendations included increased research grants and a mandatory reporting scheme for companies using nanomaterials.



Report Title: Options for a National Nanotechnology Strategy, Report to Minister Industry, Tourism, and Resources
Report ID: 83
Date: 6/1/2006
Report Type: Government Report
URL: [taskforcereport20070215100254.pdf]
Country: Australia
Organization: National Nanotechnology Strategy Taskforce
Summary: The Australian government created the Australian National Nanotechnology Taskforce with the goal of a coherent National Nanotechnology Strategy to establish a clear vision for the Australian nanotechnology industry. This Taskforce Report identifies options and recommendations for the implementation of such a strategy. Among the recommendations in this Report are the consolidation of research capabilities, the creation of a national business alliance, international marketing and cooperation, and the immediate establishment of agencies and funds for regulatory reform regarding health, safety, and environmental issues.



Report Title: Workplace exposure to toxic dust
Report ID: 82
Date: 5/1/2006
Report Type: Government Report
URL: [report.pdf]
Country: Australia
Organization: Senate Community Affairs References Committee Secretariat (Australian Senate)
Summary: In 2005, the Community Affairs References Committee of the Australian Senate, motivated by past worker exposures to asbestos, silica, and other traditional airborne dusts, initiated an investigation and report regarding exposure to toxic dusts in the workplace. The development of nanotechnology and its nanoscale materials raises fears that similar health concerns will emerge again in Australian industry. This report summarizes the current health impacts of asbestos and other particles, the adequacy of existing workplace regulations, and addresses the potential of future health issues arising from nanomaterials. The report recommends the creation of a working party on nanotechnology regulation, focusing on the adequacy of existing regulations and how to adapt the present regulatory framework to incorporate nanomaterials.



Report Title: Request for Tender: Review of Possible Impacts of Nanotechnology on Australia's Regulatory Frameworks
Report ID: 81
Date: 8/1/2006
Report Type: Government Contract
URL: [Innovation_-_Nanotechnology.pdf]
Country: Australia
Organization: Australian Government Department of Industry, Tourism and Resources
Summary: The National Nanotechnology Strategy Taskforce was established to ensure that Australia utilizes nanotechnology in a socially responsible manner. The taskforce was charged to investigate whether the current Australian regulatory framework is well-suited to managing new nanomaterials. The taskforce sought a consulting firm to report whether nanomaterials are within the scope of current Australian regulations, to develop an assessment of whether nanomaterials outside of these regulations pose significant risk, and to characterize the nature, severity, and most effective management of any such risk. This document is the official government request which solicited bids from consultants for producing the report.



 
Maps and boundary data are copyrighted by
FOTW - Flags Of The World web site