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Report Title: Commission Recommendation of 07/02/2008 on a code of conduct for responsible nanosciences and nanotechnologies research
Report ID: 554
Date: 2/7/2008
Report Type: Government Communication
URL: [nanocode-rec_pe0894c_en.pdf]
Country: European Union
Organization: European Commission
Summary: In its 2007 First Implementation Report of its Nanotechnologies Action Plan for Europe (see report ID 468), the European Commission announced its intention to create a voluntary code of conduct for responsible nanotechnology research. This code is intended to promote safe, integrated, and responsible research for the benefit of society. The code recommends that EU member states be guided by the general principles and guidelines in this document, and that they encourage its adoption by national authorities, researchers, and industry. The code’s main tenants are that nanotech research be comprehensible to the public; research should be safe, ethical, and contribute to sustainable development; research activities should be conducted according to the precautionary principle; all stakeholders should have access to research governance and be involved in decision-making; governance of research activities should encourage maximum creativity, flexibility, and planning ability for innovation; and researchers should be accountable for the social, environmental, and human health impacts of their work. The Commission announced the release of this code in an accompanying press release (see report ID 135).
Archived Copy: nanocode-rec_pe0894c_en_554_2568.pdf



Report Title: Report on the European Commission's Public Online Consultation: Towards a Strategic Nanotechnology Action Plan (snap) 2010-2015
Report ID: 482
Date: 5/11/2009
Author: European Commission
Report Type: Government Report
URL: [report_en.pdf]
Country: European Union
Organization: European Commission
Summary: The European Commission is considering a new Action Plan for Nanotechnology with the goal of addressing the technological and societal challenges nanotechnology poses and emphasizing sustainable development, competitiveness, health, safety, and environmental issues. To support the preparation of the Action Plan, a public consultation was held from December 18, 2009 to February 19, 2010 in the form of an online questionnaire, targeted at both experts in the field and the public. This document is a report on the 716 responses received. Most responses (~38%) were from individual researchers. This document is a collection and analysis of the received responses. Overall, more than 80% of respondents had either high or reasonable expectations about nanotechnology. When opinions about areas with risks and benefits are analyzed, there is a large difference between experts and the public. Information and communication technologies (ICT) and energy are the areas where the benefits are believed to far exceed the risks. Healthcare is also an area where perceived benefits are high, but so is the perception of risks. Respondents expect more action to ensure safety but all areas of nanotechnology strategy need to be pursued with stronger action.
Archived Copy: report_en_482_1219.pdf



Report Title: Nanotechnology, EU-US Co-operation: Material benefits
Report ID: 390
Date: 11/16/2001
Author: Renzo Tomellini
Report Type: Press Release
Publication: European Research Headlines
URL: [11-2001.html]
Country: European Union
Organization: European Commission
Summary: On 25-26 October, representatives of the US National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Research Directorate-General of the European Commission met to discuss research co-operation in the fields of material sciences and nanotechnologies. These two bodies first began co-operating in December 1999 and the working relationship has since developed under the umbrella of the EU research program 'Competitive and Sustainable Growth'. It is of particular relevance in light of the growing importance of the nanotechnology sector on the global market, encompassing areas such as material sciences, precision engineering, electronics and biomedical applications. The scope of the arrangement between the European Commission and the NSF in the area of material sciences extends to program exchange opportunities for entities from the EU and the US; reinforced co-operation; coordinated calls for proposals; joint organization of scientific events; extensive information exchange; and training support.



Report Title: Nanomedicine Vision Paper Unveiled at Euronanoforum
Report ID: 372
Date: 9/5/2005
Report Type: News Article
Publication: European Commission Research Industrial technologies
URL: [article_2971_en.html]
Country: European Union
Organization: European Commission
Summary: By 2015, nanotechnology-based materials, products and services – including nanomedicines – are expected to form global markets worth hundreds of billion euro each year. As part of its continuing support for EU-level collaboration in nanotechnology and nanoscience (N&N) research, the European Commission has sponsored EuroNanoForum2005, whose showpiece is the launch of the vision paper, Nanotechnology for Health. The document highlights the three interrelated themes of nanodiagnostics and imaging, targeted drug delivery, and regenerative medicine, as the basis for a Strategic Research Agenda. It concludes that the EU should set up a European Technology Platform which will address the major scientific and socio-economic issues in providing high standards of healthcare across the population by focusing on breakthrough therapies in a cost-effective framework.



Report Title: What the Seventh Framework Programme Means for Europe
Report ID: 360
Date: 9/21/2005
Report Type: News Article
Publication: Europa - Press releases
URL: [pressReleasesAction.do]
Country: European Union
Organization: European Commission
Summary: With 70 billion euros for the next seven years of European research, the European Commission is deadest on making the Seventh Framework Programme a worthwhile investment in Europe’s future. This report explores the impact of this investment by reviewing missed opportunities, past successes, and how this money will affect companies, universities, research institutes, and SMEs.
Archived Copy: MEMO-05-336_EN_360_3103.pdf



Report Title: 'talking Nano’ Wins ‘best Forum Session’ Prize at Cer2005
Report ID: 345
Date: 11/17/2005
Report Type: News Article
Publication: Europa - Industrial Technologies
URL: [article_3328_en.html]
Country: European Union
Organization: European Commission
Summary: Presentations of the Nano Dialogue, Nanologue and NanoBioRAISE projects formed the basis for a workshop on communicating nanotechnology at the CER2005 conference – which participants voted the event’s best forum session. Nanotechnology is already starting to deliver significant benefits in new or improved consumer products – but there is also widespread concern that it involves new risks. Public engagement and understanding is essential for nanotechnology’s acceptance, market potential and political governance. The workshop, which took place at the Communicating European Research 2005 conference in Brussels, set out to explore the challenges of communicating nanoscience to the general public by examining its novelty, its ethical, legal and social aspects, and the similarities and differences between the debate on nanotechnology and those surrounding other new technologies such as GMOs. The presentations were followed by a debate moderated by Richard Hayhurst, and conference participants subsequently voted the session the event’s best forum session, winning the presenters an award presented by Director-General for Research, Achilleas Mitsos.



Report Title: Sticky Nano-solutions for Electronic Assembly
Report ID: 334
Date: 1/16/2006
Report Type: News Article
Publication: European Commission Research-Industrial technologies
URL: [article_3610_en.html]
Country: European Union
Organization: European Commission
Summary: The incorporation of nanopowder fillers improves the performance of adhesives for flip chip electronic circuit assembly, the FP5 project Nanojoining has found. Flip chip electronics, in which bare integrated circuits and components are adhesively bonded face-downwards onto conductive bumps on printed circuit substrates, offer advantages in terms of size, performance, flexibility, reliability and cost over conventional wire-bonded circuitry. A key factor limiting progress has been the difficulty of producing adhesives that provide the appropriate electrical and thermal conductivity characteristics suitable for application at minimal layer thicknesses. Based on work carried out in the FP5 thematic network ‘Adhesives in Electronics’, the team at the Netherlands Organisation for Applied Scientific Research (TNO) concluded that the incorporation of nanoparticle fillers could hold the answer. It therefore assembled a consortium, bringing materials and equipment suppliers together with industrial end users and other research institutes to form the 42-month Nanojoining initiative. Several of the partners will continue with individual and collaborative research efforts in what has proved to be an extremely promising field, with major implications for Europe’s future in the electronics sector and beyond.



Report Title: Nanotechnology: Innovation for Tomorrow’s World
Report ID: 333
Date: 1/16/2006
Report Type: Brochure
Publication: European Commission Research-Industrial technologies
URL: [nano_brochure_en.pdf]
Country: European Union
Organization: European Commission
Summary: Already available in six European languages, this attractive and accessible introduction to nanotechnology has now been published in Swedish and Chinese – the first non-European edition. The brochure’s purpose is to explain nanotechnology for a general audience and thereby to stimulate public discussion. It provides a comprehensive picture of nanotechnology, describing the scientific background, technological developments, areas of application, and potential developments of the future.
Archived Copy: nano_brochure_en_333_2551.pdf



Report Title: Overview on Promising Nanomaterials for Industrial Applications
Report ID: 261
Date: 10/1/2005
Author: NanoRoad SME
Report Type: Fact Finding Report
URL: [overview_nanomaterials.pdf]
Country: European Union
Organization: European Commission
Summary: The objective of the study was to identify the relevant nano-materials with high potential for future industrial applications. Seven main material categories were chosen and for each of them a well-structured report has been prepared which summarizes all the important information on existing studies and
national reports, projects, patents and interviews of experts as well as on a literature survey. The R&D studies were divided in seven categories and give an actual picture of the nanomaterials domain. This brochure summarizes the relevant results of these seven reports in order to give an short overview of the trends, properties and possible applications in the different material categories.
Archived Copy: overview_nanomaterials_261_7274.pdf



Report Title: Final Report: COST Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Advisory Group
Report ID: 257
Date: 2/6/2003
Author: Prof. Dr. Jaroslav Cihlar and Dr. Eberhard Seitz
Report Type: General Report
URL: [nanostag-final-report.pdf]
Country: European Union
Organization: European Commission
Summary: The emerging field of nanoscience and nanotechnology research had been identified by the COST CSO in the mid 1990's. Due to its multi- and interdisciplinary character the greatest advances in this field are expected to occur at bridges between the classical disciplines represented within COST by the Technical Committees. Therefore the CSO set up in 1997 the Ad hoc Working Group on Nanoscience (AHGN), then in 2000 as follow up the Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Advisory Group (NanoSTAG), in order to stimulate and monitor activities in this field within COST as well as to look for synergy and complementarity to activities outside COST, especially in the Framework Programme of the European Commission. Eighteen COST countries nominated experts to NanoSTAG, with subsequent NanoSTAG plenary meetings that were attended by additional representatives from outside COST. Considering that NanoSTAG’s mandate terminates in March 2003, a new COST ad hoc group was presented to the Chairpersons of the relevant COST Technical Committees and Management Committees. Although a technically new group, many of the key players are already actively involved in COST. The proposal met with majority approval. This is the summary origin for NanoSTAG’s recommendation in this report for creating a Strategic Group on Nanoscience and Nanotechnlogy (working title NanoTech) for three years with firmly defined composition and tasks.
Archived Copy: nanostag-final-report_257_3875.pdf



Report Title: Funding and Support for International Nanotechnology Collaborations
Report ID: 236
Date: 12/1/2005
Author: Manuela Denis, Michael Gleiche, Tiju Joseph, Holger Hoffschulz, Witold Lojkowski, Ineke Malsch, Irena Mogilnicka, Mark Morrison, Mireille Oud
Report Type: General Report
Publication: Nanoforum
URL: [internationalnanotechnology.pdf]
Country: European Union
Organization: European Commission
Summary: Nanoforum has investigated multilateral and bilateral funding opportunities for nanotechnology open to European researchers with partners in other parts of the world. Additionally, they have also identified web portals and organizations which can help EU researchers find partners in North and South America, Eastern Europe, Russia and Newly Independent States, Asia-Pacific and Africa. The present report identifies funding opportunities at the global level and in the following world regions: North America; Latin America; Asia-Pacific; Eastern Europe, Russia and Newly Independent States; and Africa.
Archived Copy: internationalnanotechnology_236_5357.pdf



Report Title: Action Plan for European Standardisation
Report ID: 225
Date: 6/1/2008
Author: Enterprise and Industry Directorate-General; Directorate I – New Approach Industries Standardisation
Report Type: Concept Paper
URL: [standardisation_action_plan.pdf]
Country: European Union
Organization: European Commission
Summary: In its communication on “the role of European standardisation in the framework of European policies and legislation” of 18 October 2004, the Commission highlighted its standardisation policy and formulated recommendations aiming to improve the European standardisation system. It was subsequently invited by the Council to elaborate - in cooperation with Member States, parties concerned, and particularly the European standardisation organisations (ESOs) - an action plan aimed at further implementing the recommendations of the Commission’s communication. The result is this document which has been developed by the Commission in conjunction with European Free Trade Association (EFTA), the ESOs and National Standards Bodies (NSBs), the Member States and stakeholders. This action plan reflects in operational terms the Commission’s communication and the Council conclusions. It outlines the most important actions to be performed and identifies the key players for every action, though it is not exhaustive in scope. During its implementation, it is probable that more Commission services than those listed as key players in the document will be involved. The action plan also defines a timeframe for carrying out such actions.
Archived Copy: standardisation_action_plan_225_8204.pdf



Report Title: The Economic Development of Nanotechnology- an Indicators Based Analysis
Report ID: 220
Date: 11/28/2006
Author: Angela Hullmann
Report Type: Research Report
Publication: European Commission
URL: [nanoarticle_hullmann_nov2006.pdf]
Country: European Union
Organization: European Commission
Summary: As stated in the European Commission's Communication: "Nanosciences and nanotechnologies: An action plan for Europe 2005-2009" (COM(2005)243), the European Commission aims at providing favorable conditions for industrial innovation in nanotechnology to ensure that research and technological development is translated into affordable and safe wealth-generating products and processes. In order to do so, it is important to get a comprehensive picture of the state of the art of markets, companies, funding and S&T performance and prospective for development. The present analyses are based on indicators of the economic development of nanotechnology that can be publicly accessed. A focus has been put on the analysis of Europe compared to its main competitors. The data presented should not be deemed to be complete and in no way do they engage the European Commission.
Archived Copy: The economic development of nanotechnology - an indicators based analysis_220_7306.pdf



Report Title: Third International Dialogue on Responsible Research and Development of Nanotechnology
Report ID: 219
Date: 3/12/2008
Author: Renzo Tomellini and Julien Giordani
Report Type: Meeting Notes
Publication: European Commission
URL: [report_3006.pdf]
Country: European Union
Organization: European Commission
Summary: The 3rd International Dialogue on Responsible Nanotechnology took place in Brussels
(Belgium, EU) on 11-12 March 2008. This Dialogue followed the previous two successful meetings in Alexandria (Virginia, USA) in 2004, and Tokyo (Japan) in 2006. This Dialogue represents a space for facilitating international sharing, bringing together stakeholders from public administrations who meet in their personal capacity to review progress, benchmark initiatives, identify differences and specificities, and explore synergies, with the ultimate aim of contributing to a responsible and sustainable development of nanotechnology. The aim of the Dialogue is to be inclusive with regard to all countries interested in a responsible and sustainable development of nanotechnology so as to contribute to a development of nanotechnology that corresponds to the need of society as a whole, without disequilibria or “divides” within or between countries and regions. Several specific issues were addressed, including: nanotechnology governance, bridging the knowledge gap, creating standards and definitions of intellectual protection, societal engagement.
Archived Copy: Third International Dialogue on Responsible Research and Development of Nanotechnology_219_3384.pdf



Report Title: Third International Dialogue on Responsible Research and Development of Nanotechnology
Report ID: 217
Date: 3/12/2008
Author: Renzo Tomellini and Julien Giordani
Report Type: Meeting Notes
Publication: European Commission
URL: [report_3006.pdf]
Country: European Union
Organization: European Commission
Summary: The 3rd International Dialogue on Responsible Nanotechnology took place in Brussels
(Belgium, EU) on 11-12 March 2008. This Dialogue followed the previous two successful meetings in Alexandria (Virginia, USA) in 2004, and Tokyo (Japan) in 2006. This Dialogue represents a space for facilitating international sharing, bringing together stakeholders from public administrations who meet in their personal capacity to review progress, benchmark initiatives, identify differences and specificities, and explore synergies, with the ultimate aim of contributing to a responsible and sustainable development of nanotechnology. The aim of the Dialogue is to be inclusive with regard to all countries interested in a responsible and sustainable development of nanotechnology so as to contribute to a development of nanotechnology that corresponds to the need of society as a whole, without disequilibria or “divides” within or between countries and regions. Several specific issues were addressed, including: nanotechnology governance, bridging the knowledge gap, creating standards and definitions of intellectual protection, societal engagement.
Archived Copy: nanotechnology - health and environmental risks of nanoparticles_217_3284.pdf



Report Title: Nanosciences and Nanotechnologies: an Action Plan for Europe 2005-2009
Report ID: 202
Date: 1/1/2005
Author: European Commission
Report Type: Guidance Document
URL: [nano_action_plan_en.pdf]
Country: European Union
Organization: European Commission
Summary: On 12 May 2004 the European Commission adopted the Communication Towards a European Strategy for Nanotechnology in which a safe, integrated and responsible strategy was proposed. Its aim was to reinforce the European Union's leading position in nanotechnology research and development and innovation while addressing any environmental, health, safety and societal concerns upfront. In this context, several issues were highlighted, ranging from the development of world-class competitive R&D infrastructure to cooperating at with initiatives at the international level. In its conclusions of 24 September 2004, the Competitiveness Council welcomed the proposed integrated and responsible approach and the Commission's intention to draw up an Action Plan for nanotechnology. The European Economic and Social Committee subsequently adopted an opinion on the 10 November 2004 that supported the Commission's proposed approach. All stakeholders were invited to provide their opinion on the Commission's proposal via an extensive open consultation that closed on the 15 October 2004. Over 750 responses were received supporting the elements of the Commission's proposal. The Commission harnessed these results to form this Action Plan, which defines a series of articulated and interconnected actions for the immediate implementation of a safe, integrated and responsible strategy for N&N based on the priority areas identified in the above-mentioned Communication. Regarding nanobiotechnology, this Action Plan complements the Commission's Strategy for Europe on Life Sciences and Biotechnology.
Archived Copy: nano_action_plan_en_202_1165.pdf



Report Title: Nanosciences and Nanotechnologies: An Action Plan for Europe 2005-2009
Report ID: 195
Date: 6/7/2005
Author: European Commission
Report Type: Government Communication
URL: [nano_action_plan_en.pdf]
Country: European Union
Organization: European Commission
Summary: Advances in nanotechnology necessitate a comprehensive strategy for managing these new developments to ensure that environmental, health, safety, and societal concerns are addressed. In May 2004, the European Commission adopted the Communication Towards a European Strategy for Nanotechnology, which proposed the safe, integrated, and responsible strategy. This communication continues that strategy with an 16-page action plan, which defines specific actions to be undertaken by both the Commission and the EU member states for the implementation of the strategy. The Commission will support nanotechnology through a proposed doubling of the budget for the EUs research, technological development, and demonstration program. Selected areas for development include the establishment of European Poles of Excellence; international cooperation; public health, safety, and environmental protection; addressing ethical concerns; interdisciplinary training; consumer protection; and ensuring that the overarching strategy is coherent and visible at the European level.
Archived Copy: nano_action_plan_en_195_8090.pdf



Report Title: Towards a European Strategy for Nanotechnology
Report ID: 189
Date: 5/12/2004
Author: European Commission
Report Type: Government Communication
URL: [nano_com_en.pdf]
Country: European Union
Organization: European Commission
Summary: This communication from the Commission of the European Communities emphasizes the need for the European Union to translate its investment in nanotechnology research into commercially viable products. It calls for action in a variety of areas, including an increase in research and development expenditures, the development of infrastructure, the promotion of a stronger entrepreneurial market, and the integration of health risk assessment into every stage of the nanomaterial life cycle. Poles of excellence infrastructure capable of supporting world-class research and development for industry and research organizations are the key to improving the EUs excellence in nanotechnology. This document also describes and analyzes the current state of nanotechnology development and research. One significant finding is that all EU countries except Ireland have lower per capita nanotechnology investment than the United States and Japan.
Archived Copy: Michael Vincent EC (2004), Communication towards a European strategy_189_4730.pdf



Report Title: Commission Starts Public Dialogue on Nanotechnologies Tapping Economic and Environmental Potential Through Safe Products
Report ID: 179
Date: 6/17/2008
Report Type: Press Release
URL: [pressReleasesAction.do]
Country: European Union
Organization: European Commission
Summary: This press release announces that the European Commission considers a regulatory framework for the safe development of nanotechnology to be vital and will be conducting an open dialogue with citizens and stakeholders. The Commission intends to apply the precautionary principle to ensure public safety while ensuring that society benefits from nanotechnology. It is also announced that the Commission is supporting research and development through the Joint Research Centre and coordinated activities with the OECD and the ISO.
Archived Copy: Michael Vincent EC (2007), Commission starts public dialogue_179_2447.pdf



Report Title: Follow-up to the 6th Meeting of the REACH Competent Authorities for the Implementation of Regulation (EC) 1907/2006 (REACH)
Report ID: 137
Date: 12/16/2008
Report Type: Government Report
URL: [nanomaterials.pdf]
Country: European Union
Organization: European Commission
Summary: The EU's REACH legislation aims to ensure the protection of human health and the environment. It regulates the manufacture, usage, and sale of certain substances in order to further this goal. The development of nanomaterials poses numerous challenges to the applicability of REACH. This document discusses this applicability and the challenges faced in ensuring that new nanoscale materials are adequately covered under EU regulation. For example, one major challenge is the threshold at which substances must be registered. Nanoscale substances are considered phase-in substances under REACH, and must be registered with the EU if manufactured or imported in quantities of one ton per year or greater. This limit formerly was ten kilograms per year. Regulations are also adapting to better account for the different properties of nanoscale versus bulk substances, which can have starkly different toxicological effects. This report discusses these and other current nanomaterial issues.



Report Title: European Commission Adopts Code of Conduct for Responsible Nanosciences and Nanotechnologies Research
Report ID: 135
Date: 2/8/2008
Author: European Commission
Report Type: Press Release
URL: [pressReleasesAction.do]
Country: European Union
Organization: European Commission
Summary: This press release announces the European Commission's adoption of its "Code of Conduct" for governing nanotechnology research. Following the 2005 "Nanotechnologies Action Plan," the Code provides seven principles for research: (i) meaning, (ii) sustainability, (iii) precaution, (iv) inclusiveness, (v) excellence, (vi) innovation, and (vii) accountability. These principles are implemented in guidelines aiming for good governance of research, due respect of precaution, and dissemination and monitoring of the Code.



 
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